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A team of scientists from Weill Cornell Medicine and The Rockefeller University has illuminated the basic mechanism of Piezo proteins, which function as sensors in the body for mechanical stimuli such as touch, bladder fullness and blood pressure. The discovery is a feat of basic science that also opens up many new paths of investigation into the roles of Piezo proteins in human diseases and potential new therapeutic strategies.

In the study, published Aug. 21 in Nature, the scientists...

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Four distinguished Weill Cornell Medicine physician-scientists – Drs. Silvia Formenti, Barbara Hempstead, Lisa Newman and Laura Riley – have been selected as Crain’s Notable Women in Healthcare in New York City.

The Weill Cornell Medicine awardees are part of a list of 100 women chosen by Crain’s New York Business for outstanding professional and philanthropic achievements in New York City, as well as proven commitments to mentorship and the promotion of diversity and inclusion in the...

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Four distinguished Weill Cornell Medicine physician-scientists – Drs. Silvia Formenti, Barbara Hempstead, Lisa Newman and Laura Riley – have been selected as Crain’s Notable Women in Health Care in New York City.

The Weill Cornell Medicine awardees are part of a list of 100 women chosen by Crain’s New York Business for outstanding professional and philanthropic achievements in New York City, as well as proven commitments to mentorship and the promotion of diversity and inclusion in the...

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A molecule best known for its association with migraines may be a key to new treatments for common worm infections as well as allergic inflammatory disorders such as asthma, according to a study from scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine and the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The scientists, whose work was published July 25 in Immunity, found a subset of white blood cells that reside in the lungs of mammals and produce the molecule, called CGRP, during worm infection in mice. The...

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By Amy Crawford

Dr. Juan Cubillos-Ruiz got his first look at ovarian cancer early in his doctoral research, which focused on understanding how the microenvironment of a tumor affects a patient’s immune system. “It was one of my first experiments,” recalls Dr. Cubillos-Ruiz, now an assistant professor of microbiology and immunology in obstetrics and gynecology at Weill Cornell Medicine, where he is also a member of the Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center. “I got a specimen from a patient to...

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By Amy Crawford

Dr. Juan Cubillos-Ruiz got his first look at ovarian cancer early in his doctoral research, which focused on understanding how the microenvironment of a tumor affects a patient’s immune system. “It was one of my first experiments,” recalls Dr. Cubillos-Ruiz, now an assistant professor of microbiology and immunology in obstetrics and gynecology at Weill Cornell Medicine, where he is also a member of the Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center. “I got a specimen from a patient to...

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Matthew Laghezza, chief physician assistant in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine and the Lisa Perry Emergency Center at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, was named 2018 Emergency Medicine Physician Assistant of the Year by the Society of Emergency Medicine Physician Assistants.

The award recognizes physician assistants who demonstrate exceptional service and leadership in emergency medicine, the emergency medicine physician assistant...

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The Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences has been awarded a competitive grant from the National Institutes of Health to launch a program dedicated to increasing the number and enhancing the success of doctoral students from underrepresented backgrounds.

The five-year, $2.4 million award from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health will fund the Weill Cornell Initiative to Maximize Student Development...

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A new technology devised by scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine and the New York Genome Center (NYGC) enables the measurement of gene mutations and their effects on gene activity within individual cancer cells biopsied from patients.

The advance, reported July 3 in Nature, allows researchers to study, in unprecedented detail, the complex dynamics of cancerous cell populations during the course of disease and in response to therapies. That could lead to more effective new anticancer...

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Weill Cornell Medicine
Graduate School of Medical Sciences
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