News

Dr. Rache Simmons, associate dean for diversity and inclusion at Weill Cornell Medicine, has been named one of Crain’s inaugural Notable Women in Talent Resources in the Greater New York City area.

For its inaugural list, Crain’s New York Business selected 62 honorees—women executives working in human resources, talent retention and acquisition, and diversity and inclusion—to celebrate them for their varied achievements.

“I’m very flattered and honored to have been selected for...

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TylerAnne Valerio’s love of biology, pathology and anatomy left her with “a fascination for all things medicine,” she said, and a desire to experience the unique opportunities physician assistants have to switch between specialties. It was her work as a volunteer EMT that inspired her to be in a helping profession. 

“I wanted to become a PA in order to positively impact the lives of others in ways I believe are only possible through medicine,” she said. “I hope to help patients when...

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Everyone agrees: When it comes to healthcare, it's important for patients and their caretakers to have access to medical records, but that's often easier said than done. Medical information can be fragmented across healthcare providers, making it challenging for patients and their families to have a comprehensive view of their healthcare needs. Six students from Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University, Columbia University and City Tech thought there should be a tool to help, and banded...

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Video of Weill Cornell Medicine Honors Dr. Barbara Hempstead

Dr. Barbara Hempstead, dean of the Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences, has been awarded Weill Cornell Medicine’s Joan and Sanford I. Weill Exemplary Achievement Award.

The Weill Award was established in 2018 to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the medical college’s renaming in honor of the institution’s foremost benefactors, Joan and Sanford I. Weill. The Weill Award recognizes outstanding...

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Dr. Adrian Jinich came to Weill Cornell Medicine in 2018 as a new postdoc—with the goal, he says, of doing cutting edge research “while making the world a better, healthier and more just place.” He was already on that path: he’d previously co-founded a series of free STEM workshops for high school and college students in his home country of Mexico and elsewhere, as a way to improve access to high-quality science education for the underserved. At Weill Cornell Medicine, Dr. Jinich has...

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Dr. Adrian Jinich came to Weill Cornell Medicine in 2018 as a new postdoc—with the goal, he says, of doing cutting edge research “while making the world a better, healthier and more just place.” He was already on that path: he’d previously co-founded a series of free STEM workshops for high school and college students in his home country of Mexico and elsewhere, as a way to improve access to high-quality science education for the underserved. At Weill Cornell Medicine, Dr. Jinich has...

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Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in kidney transplant patients may be caused by bacteria that originate in the digestive tract, according to investigators at Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University and NewYork-Presbyterian.

The study, published Dec. 4 in Nature Communications, suggests that the gut microbiota - the unique bacterial population of the digestive system - may be capable of “seeding” the urinary tract with infectious organisms. The research also suggests that new...

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Scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine, Stanford University and the University of California, San Francisco have adapted genome editing tools to function in a common species of intestinal bacteria. With this technological advance, they can now precisely alter the human gut microbes’ production of small molecule metabolites that can affect their host’s metabolism, immune system and nervous system. The technique has revealed a new regulator of mucosal immune function, which...

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A common variation in a human gene that affects the brain’s reward processing circuit increases vulnerability to the rewarding effects of the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis in adolescent females, but not males, according to preclinical research by Weill Cornell Medicine investigators. As adolescence represents a highly sensitive period of brain development with the highest risk for initiating cannabis use, these findings in mice have important implications for understanding the...

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