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News

Gut bacteria play an important role in the body’s response to treatment for tuberculosis (TB), according to researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine and Memorial Sloan Kettering. Because current treatments for TB involve long courses of antibiotics, which are known to disrupt the balance of microbes in the gut, a better understanding of these interactions may help in predicting outcomes to therapy and suggest ways to improve it.

In their study, published Feb. 18 in Nature Communications,...

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A team led by scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine has made a map identifying all the different RNA molecules that are derived from each gene in the brains of mice. It is the first map that depicts this important layer of biological diversity, called isoform variation, by cell type and across brain regions for the whole genome, and it contributes to neuroscientists’ ambitious goal of an ultra-detailed atlas of the brain.

Isoform variation is a process that extends the versatility of...

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By Heather Salerno 
Portraits by John Abbott

Like so many others across America and beyond, second-year medical student Chimsom Orakwue was outraged by the harrowing footage that captured the last moments of George Floyd’s life, as a white Minneapolis police officer knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes during an arrest late last spring. Something about the protests in the wake of Floyd’s death felt different from the demonstrations against police brutality that Orakwue had marched...

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A gene linked to unusually long lifespans in humans protects brain stem cells from the harmful effects of stress, according to a new study by Weill Cornell Medicine investigators.

Studies of humans who live longer than 100 years have shown that many share an unusual version of a gene called Forkhead box protein O3 (FOXO3). That discovery led Dr. Jihye Paik, associate professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine, and her colleagues to investigate how this...

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The discovery of an “Achilles heel” in a type of gut bacteria that causes intestinal inflammation in patients with Crohn’s disease may lead to more targeted therapies for the difficult to treat disease, according to Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian investigators.

In a study published Feb. 3 in Cell Host and Microbe, the investigators showed that patients with Crohn’s disease have an overabundance of a type of gut bacteria called adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC...

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Common fungi, often present in the gut, teach the immune system how to respond to their more dangerous relatives, according to new research from scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine. Breakdowns in this process can leave people susceptible to deadly fungal infections.

The study, published Feb. 5 in Cell, reveals a new twist in the complex relationship between humans and their associated microbes, and points the way toward novel therapies that could help combat a rising tide of drug-...

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The Starr Cancer Consortium has awarded grant funding to three Weill Cornell Medicine-led multi institution teams to advance their groundbreaking cancer research projects. The grants will support studies on mechanisms that drive lymphoma and urothelial cancers, and the effects of radiation therapy.

Established by the Starr Foundation in 2006, the Starr Cancer Consortium is a collaboration among five leading research institutions: The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cold Spring...

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A new test for measuring the reservoir of HIV hidden in the cells of people with HIV failed to detect this reservoir in a significant number of people with a subtype of HIV-1, according to a study from scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine, Simon Fraser University and the British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS. Modifications to the test, which is frequently used in clinical trials for new HIV-1 treatments and potential cures, could potentially improve its utility....

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Mutations in proteins called histone H1, which help package DNA in chromosomes, are a frequent cause of lymphomas, according to a study led by researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine, NewYork-Presbyterian and The Rockefeller University. The findings could lead to new approaches to treating these cancers.

Scientists in recent years have observed that mutations in histone H1 genes occur in lymphomas, but they have not known whether these mutations are causes...

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