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News

Dr. Adrian Jinich came to Weill Cornell Medicine in 2018 as a new postdoc—with the goal, he says, of doing cutting edge research “while making the world a better, healthier and more just place.” He was already on that path: he’d previously co-founded a series of free STEM workshops for high school and college students in his home country of Mexico and elsewhere, as a way to improve access to high-quality science education for the underserved. At Weill Cornell Medicine, Dr. Jinich has...

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Dr. Adrian Jinich came to Weill Cornell Medicine in 2018 as a new postdoc—with the goal, he says, of doing cutting edge research “while making the world a better, healthier and more just place.” He was already on that path: he’d previously co-founded a series of free STEM workshops for high school and college students in his home country of Mexico and elsewhere, as a way to improve access to high-quality science education for the underserved. At Weill Cornell Medicine, Dr. Jinich has...

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Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in kidney transplant patients may be caused by bacteria that originate in the digestive tract, according to investigators at Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University and NewYork-Presbyterian.

The study, published Dec. 4 in Nature Communications, suggests that the gut microbiota - the unique bacterial population of the digestive system - may be capable of “seeding” the urinary tract with infectious organisms. The research also suggests that new...

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Scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine, Stanford University and the University of California, San Francisco have adapted genome editing tools to function in a common species of intestinal bacteria. With this technological advance, they can now precisely alter the human gut microbes’ production of small molecule metabolites that can affect their host’s metabolism, immune system and nervous system. The technique has revealed a new regulator of mucosal immune function, which...

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A common variation in a human gene that affects the brain’s reward processing circuit increases vulnerability to the rewarding effects of the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis in adolescent females, but not males, according to preclinical research by Weill Cornell Medicine investigators. As adolescence represents a highly sensitive period of brain development with the highest risk for initiating cannabis use, these findings in mice have important implications for understanding the...

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A common variation in a human gene that affects the brain’s reward processing circuit increases vulnerability to the rewarding effects of the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis in adolescent females, but not males, according to preclinical research by Weill Cornell Medicine investigators. As adolescence represents a highly sensitive period of brain development with the highest risk for initiating cannabis use, these findings in mice have important implications for understanding the...

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The scope of the DNA changes that drive cancers has been illuminated as never before in a set of studies by a large international scientific team including Weill Cornell Medicine researchers.

In six studies published Feb. 5 in Nature, and 18 papers in other Nature-affiliated journals, this scientific consortium reported the results from analyses of DNA from more than 2,600 biopsied tumor samples across 38 different types of cancer. Unlike traditional cancer genetics projects that...

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Immune cell activity in the brain differs between males and females in ways that may explain why some neurodegenerative diseases affect the sexes differently, according to a new study from Weill Cornell Medicine scientists.

The study, published Dec. 23 in Nature Neuroscience, compared brain-resident immune cells called microglia in male and female mice. Microglia in Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders appear to help protect the brain from the disease process,...

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Immune cell activity in the brain differs between males and females in ways that may explain why some neurodegenerative diseases affect the sexes differently, according to a new study from Weill Cornell Medicine scientists.

The study, published Dec. 23 in Nature Neuroscience, compared brain-resident immune cells called microglia in male and female mice. Microglia in Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders appear to help protect the brain from the disease process,...

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Molecules that coordinate the development of highly specialized blood vessels in the kidney have been identified by investigators at Weill Cornell Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and Hofstra University. The findings pave the way toward new strategies for repairing damaged organs.

Dr. Shahin Rafii, director of Ansary Stem Cell Institute at Weill Cornell Medicine, and his colleagues performed a comprehensive analysis of the genetic programs that underlie the...

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