Graduate School of Medical Sciences

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Seminars

December 16, 2017 - 3:30pm
FINAL DAY of a 3-DAY COURSE: LAB SESSIONS A certain level of controversy surrounds MIS surgery and navigation versus standard operative procedures for the treatment of spinal disorders. MIS surgery provides patients with a less invasive procedure that minimizes blood loss and hospital stay, and promotes a more speedy recovery, but is it the correct procedure for the patient, and how does one weigh the pros and cons? Many surgeons currently do not have the expertise or technical knowledge to inform this decision-making process, which requires a comprehensive understanding of the new and less invasive techniques with and without stereotactic navigation for the operative treatment of spinal disorders, particularly an understanding of the skills essential in selecting appropriate patients for MIS surgery. Through lectures, panel discussion and Socratic debates covering the most current techniques (microdiscectomy/laminectomy using tubular access, minimally invasive TLIF, transpsoas approach), pros/cons of MIS, complex case reviews, and a look at the future of MIS, this course will provide surgeons with a better understanding of available procedures and criteria for appropriate patient selection. The course begins at noon on Thursday, December 14, 2017; lectures continue through Friday, December 15. Saturday the course moves to the Anatomy Lab at 1300 York Avenue for the hands-on training portion of the course.
December 16, 2017 - 5:00pm
FINAL DAY of a 3-DAY COURSE: LAB SESSIONS A certain level of controversy surrounds MIS surgery and navigation versus standard operative procedures for the treatment of spinal disorders. MIS surgery provides patients with a less invasive procedure that minimizes blood loss and hospital stay, and promotes a more speedy recovery, but is it the correct procedure for the patient, and how does one weigh the pros and cons? Many surgeons currently do not have the expertise or technical knowledge to inform this decision-making process, which requires a comprehensive understanding of the new and less invasive techniques with and without stereotactic navigation for the operative treatment of spinal disorders, particularly an understanding of the skills essential in selecting appropriate patients for MIS surgery. Through lectures, panel discussion and Socratic debates covering the most current techniques (microdiscectomy/laminectomy using tubular access, minimally invasive TLIF, transpsoas approach), pros/cons of MIS, complex case reviews, and a look at the future of MIS, this course will provide surgeons with a better understanding of available procedures and criteria for appropriate patient selection. The course begins at noon on Thursday, December 14, 2017; lectures continue through Friday, December 15. Saturday the course moves to the Anatomy Lab at 1300 York Avenue for the hands-on training portion of the course.
December 18, 2017 (All day)
Creating the right health approaches and care for the right person is called precision medicine. Getting the right information to make that happen is the goal of the All of Us Research Program from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). To get there, we want to create the largest health database ever. By understanding people’s health, neighborhood, family, and lifestyle, researchers will have information to better understand health and disease. This information is essential to create a healthier future for generations to come. New York City Consortium The New York City Consortium is a partner of the All of Us Research Program. The Consortium includes Columbia University Medical Center, Weill Cornell Medicine, NYC Health + Hospitals Harlem and New York-Presbyterian. All of Us is part of the National Institutes of Health. The All of Us New York City Consortium is calling on volunteers like you. We hope you will help make history and change the future of health. The health data you share will be added to the All of Us database. Researchers can access this data to conduct studies. Steps to Join: 1. Email AllofUs-Cornell@med.cornell.edu for your verification code.2. Access joinallofus.org and begin registration.3. Complete on-line consent forms.4. Complete Health Questionnaires.5. Attend a free appointment to provide physical measurements, blood and urine samples. Upon completion of all steps, you will be given a $25 American Express gift card at your free appointment. For more information, contact AllofUs-Cornell@med.cornell.edu or call 646-962-6170. You can also visit us at joinallofus.org
December 18, 2017 - 1:00pm
"Genetic Dissection of a miR-200 Regulated Network in Epithelial Cells" Markus Stoffel, M.D., Ph.D. Professor, Head of Laboratory of Metabolic Diseases Institute of Molecular Systems Biology ETH Zürich, Switzerland Host: Dr. Andrea Ventura Tea: 11:45 a.m.
December 18, 2017 - 2:30pm
"Innate Lymphoid Cells in Immunity" Marco Colonna, M.D. Endowed Professor of Pathology Professor of Immunology and Medicine Washington University School of Medicine Saint Louis, MO Hosted by Joseph Sun Tea: 1:15 p.m.
December 18, 2017 - 5:00pm
"Precision Pathology: A Journey Has Begun" Juan Miguel Mosquera, MD Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Co-Chief, Genitourinary Pathology Director of Pathology, The Englander Institute for Precision Medicine
December 18, 2017 - 6:00pm
Juan Miguel Mosquera, M.D. Associate Professor of Pathology and Oncology Co-Chief, Genitourinary Pathology Director of Pathology at the Englander Institute for Precision Medicine Weill Cornell Medicine "Precision Pathology: A Journey Has Begun"

Weill Cornell Medicine
Graduate School of Medical Sciences
1300 York Ave. Box 65 New York, NY 10065 Phone: (212) 746-6565 Fax: (212) 746-5981