Graduate School of Medical Sciences

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Seminars

December 14, 2017 - 12:00pm
A certain level of controversy surrounds MIS surgery and navigation versus standard operative procedures for the treatment of spinal disorders. MIS surgery provides patients with a less invasive procedure that minimizes blood loss and hospital stay, and promotes a more speedy recovery, but is it the correct procedure for the patient, and how does one weigh the pros and cons? Many surgeons currently do not have the expertise or technical knowledge to inform this decision-making process, which requires a comprehensive understanding of the new and less invasive techniques with and without stereotactic navigation for the operative treatment of spinal disorders, particularly an understanding of the skills essential in selecting appropriate patients for MIS surgery. Through lectures, panel discussion and Socratic debates covering the most current techniques (microdiscectomy/laminectomy using tubular access, minimally invasive TLIF, transpsoas approach), pros/cons of MIS, complex case reviews, and a look at the future of MIS, this course will provide surgeons with a better understanding of available procedures and criteria for appropriate patient selection. The course begins at noon on Thursday, December 14, 2017; lectures continue through Friday, December 15. Saturday the course moves to the Anatomy Lab at 1300 York Avenue for the hands-on training portion of the course.
December 14, 2017 - 1:00pm
Weill Cornell Medicine Departments of Biochemistry and Cell & Developmental Biology present: Andrew Kruse, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Department of Biological Chemistry & Molecular Pharmacology Harvard Medical School
December 14, 2017 - 3:00pm
"An Evolutionary Perspective on Meiotic Recombination in Vertebrates" Molly Przeworski, Ph.D. Professor, Department of Biological Sciences and Department of Systems Biology Columbia University, New York, NY Host: Maria Jasin Tea Time at 1:45 PM
December 15, 2017 - 11:00am
Goal Attainment Scaling: Defining the Success of Elder Mistreatment Interventions by David Burnes, PhD, Assistant Professor at University of Toronto, Factor-Inwentash Faculty Social Work and Affiliate Scientist at Baycest Health Sciences. DESCRIPTION David Burnes, PhD will review current data about the prevalence and risk factors of elder mistreatment, critique the central way of understanding elder mistreatment as a yes/no issue, and make a case for conceptualizing elder mistreatment along a continuum of severity. Dr. Burnes will present his research on a client-centered treatment planning and measurement procedure for use in community-based elder mistreatment response interventions. This is called “goal attainment scaling,” which accommodates different definitions of intervention success across cases. A light breakfast will be served. Please plan to stay at the end of the meeting for networking with your colleagues. There is no fee for this educational and networking event.Space is limited. First come, first servedPlease email Kasey Brown at kbrown@nyceac.com, or call (212) 746-1416 with any questions. To register, click here.
December 15, 2017 - 1:00pm
RSVP Here: http://bit.ly/2C3aM02 We will introduce tools for case presentations, including IGV, cBioPortal, and SharePoint, as well as discuss data analysis for germline, organoids, RNA-seq and Oncomine. Past residents, fellows and med students have found this to be a great experience. You will learn how to mine molecular data (whole-exome sequencing, RNA-Seq, etc.) and integrate it with clinico-pathologic information toward patient care. This is an advantageous learning experience as genomic education is at the forefront training programs across WCM.
December 16, 2017 - 3:30pm
FINAL DAY of a 3-DAY COURSE: LAB SESSIONS A certain level of controversy surrounds MIS surgery and navigation versus standard operative procedures for the treatment of spinal disorders. MIS surgery provides patients with a less invasive procedure that minimizes blood loss and hospital stay, and promotes a more speedy recovery, but is it the correct procedure for the patient, and how does one weigh the pros and cons? Many surgeons currently do not have the expertise or technical knowledge to inform this decision-making process, which requires a comprehensive understanding of the new and less invasive techniques with and without stereotactic navigation for the operative treatment of spinal disorders, particularly an understanding of the skills essential in selecting appropriate patients for MIS surgery. Through lectures, panel discussion and Socratic debates covering the most current techniques (microdiscectomy/laminectomy using tubular access, minimally invasive TLIF, transpsoas approach), pros/cons of MIS, complex case reviews, and a look at the future of MIS, this course will provide surgeons with a better understanding of available procedures and criteria for appropriate patient selection. The course begins at noon on Thursday, December 14, 2017; lectures continue through Friday, December 15. Saturday the course moves to the Anatomy Lab at 1300 York Avenue for the hands-on training portion of the course.
December 16, 2017 - 5:00pm
FINAL DAY of a 3-DAY COURSE: LAB SESSIONS A certain level of controversy surrounds MIS surgery and navigation versus standard operative procedures for the treatment of spinal disorders. MIS surgery provides patients with a less invasive procedure that minimizes blood loss and hospital stay, and promotes a more speedy recovery, but is it the correct procedure for the patient, and how does one weigh the pros and cons? Many surgeons currently do not have the expertise or technical knowledge to inform this decision-making process, which requires a comprehensive understanding of the new and less invasive techniques with and without stereotactic navigation for the operative treatment of spinal disorders, particularly an understanding of the skills essential in selecting appropriate patients for MIS surgery. Through lectures, panel discussion and Socratic debates covering the most current techniques (microdiscectomy/laminectomy using tubular access, minimally invasive TLIF, transpsoas approach), pros/cons of MIS, complex case reviews, and a look at the future of MIS, this course will provide surgeons with a better understanding of available procedures and criteria for appropriate patient selection. The course begins at noon on Thursday, December 14, 2017; lectures continue through Friday, December 15. Saturday the course moves to the Anatomy Lab at 1300 York Avenue for the hands-on training portion of the course.
December 18, 2017 - 1:00pm
"Genetic Dissection of a miR-200 Regulated Network in Epithelial Cells" Markus Stoffel, M.D., Ph.D. Professor, Head of Laboratory of Metabolic Diseases Institute of Molecular Systems Biology ETH Zürich, Switzerland Host: Dr. Andrea Ventura Tea: 11:45 a.m.
December 18, 2017 - 2:30pm
"Innate Lymphoid Cells in Immunity" Marco Colonna, M.D. Endowed Professor of Pathology Professor of Immunology and Medicine Washington University School of Medicine Saint Louis, MO Hosted by Joseph Sun Tea: 1:15 p.m.
December 18, 2017 - 5:00pm
"Precision Pathology: A Journey Has Begun" Juan Miguel Mosquera, MD Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Co-Chief, Genitourinary Pathology Director of Pathology, The Englander Institute for Precision Medicine

Weill Cornell Medicine
Graduate School of Medical Sciences
1300 York Ave. Box 65 New York, NY 10065 Phone: (212) 746-6565 Fax: (212) 746-5981